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DOJ’s Possible Antitrust Chief’s Senate Confirmation Hearing

Last month, we discussed Makan Delrahim’s background, including his experience litigating antitrust and intellectual property matters at the Department of Justice during the George W. Bush administration and his extensive lobbying work at Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber and Schreck. On May 10, senators from the Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing and asked Delrahim about several … Continue Reading

Trump’s Pick for Department of Justice Antitrust Division Chief

Last month we discussed Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation hearings. Specifically, we noted the Senate Judiciary Committee’s failure to nail Gorsuch down on key antitrust issues, including issues he handled as an experienced antitrust lawyer and decided as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, which we also wrote … Continue Reading

The Senate’s Uneventful Gorsuch Confirmation Hearing

Recently, we discussed in prior articles the antitrust legacy of Neil Gorsuch, currently a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit and nominee for the Supreme Court of the United States. Gorsuch has significant antitrust experience, both in private practice and on the bench. While at Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd, Evans … Continue Reading

Antitrust Legacy of High Court Nominee Gorsuch in Private Practice

Last month, we discussed the antitrust jurisprudence  of Neil Gorsuch, currently of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit judge and nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States. Our discussion focused on three of Gorsuch’s opinions during his decade-long tenure with the court of appeals. Even before Gorsuch was nominated to … Continue Reading

The Antitrust Points of View of Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch

Last March, we wrote a series of articles discussing Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s antitrust legacy on the Supreme Court. We noted Scalia’s admitted discomfort with the Sherman Act, specifically with holding corporate defendants, even monopolists, liable absent strong evidence of anti-competitive conduct. His likely successor appears to possibly hold similar views of the antitrust … Continue Reading

Carl Hittinger Examines American Monopolists through the Lens of History, Politics

Partner Carl Hittinger has authored a series of articles for The Legal Intelligencer that explores the history of select American monopolists by posing two fundamental questions: Why have some monopolists succeeded in gaining, maintaining and increasing monopoly power where others have failed? Why does history keep repeating itself and the basic lessons taught have not … Continue Reading

Abrams, Commins, Foix Author Article on Antitrust Suit Counterclaims

Partners Robert Abrams, Gregory Commins and Danyll Foix authored an article published in “The Antitrust Review of the Americas 2017,” published by Global Competition Review. Their article, “United States: Private Antitrust Litigation,” reviews counterclaims in antitrust litigation in the United States and discusses the strategies behind their use in intellectual property, franchise, distribution and other … Continue Reading

BakerHostetler Antitrust Lawyer Reviews Unusual Incentive Payment/Failing Firm Defense Remedy in Recent Hospital Merger

Antitrust Partner Danyll W. Foix wrote an article, published November 17, 2016 by Law360, reviewing the Federal Trade Commission’s acceptance of an unusual settlement for a challenged hospital merger, explaining that “the settlement ends the FTC’s challenge of a transaction that was too small to be reportable under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act, and the settlement is … Continue Reading

How to Avoid Antitrust Trouble in Wake of North Carolina Dental Ruling on State Action Immunity

BakerHostetler Antitrust Litigation Partners Robert Abrams, Gregory Commins, and Danyll Foix authored an article for The Antitrust Review of the Americas 2016, published by Global Competition Review. The article, headlined “United States: Private Antitrust Litigation,” analyzes emerging cases in the wake of North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission. These cases, … Continue Reading

Antitrust, Appointments and Presidential Front-Runners: Part 1

Substantial and substantive issues of national importance are often ­obscured by the usual myopic and frenzied focus on political talking points, sensational sound bites and collateral name-calling. This is perhaps better exemplified in presidential elections than contests for other political offices. The current race to the presidency is plainly setting a new high (or low) … Continue Reading

Scalia’s Antitrust Legacy: Part 2, The Dissenting Opinions

In March, we wrote about Justice Antonin Scalia’s three majority opinions in substantive antitrust cases. Notably, Scalia also authored three dissenting opinions in substantive antitrust cases, in rapid-fire succession in 1991, ’92 and ’93. In the majority opinions, Scalia seized upon alternative, innocuous explanations for alleged anticompetitive conduct, even when an anticompetitive motive was equally … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Nominee Garland: An Assessment of Antitrust Expertise

Last month, our antitrust column was devoted to the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s antitrust legacy on the U.S. Supreme Court, focusing on his three antitrust opinions for the majority. At that time, we promised to continue that analysis, focusing this month on Scalia’s many antitrust dissents. However, history intervened and President Obama nominated Chief Judge … Continue Reading

Justice Scalia’s Antitrust Legacy: Part 1, The Majority Opinions

Justice Antonin Scalia once observed that “the American people are neither sheep nor fools,” in McConnell v. Federal Election Commission, 540 U.S. 93 (2003). During his 30 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, he wrote 104 majority opinions but only three of those addressed substantive antitrust issues. This article addresses those three seminal antitrust opinions. Next … Continue Reading

Symposium Advances Debate Over FTC’s Section 5 Enforcement Powers

What is an “unfair method of competition” for purposes of the Federal Trade Commission’s enforcement powers? For more than 100 years, lawyers, economists and other experts—as well as courts—have debated that question, trying to determine exactly what conduct Congress meant to prohibit, beyond conduct already condemned by the antitrust laws, when it enacted Section 5 … Continue Reading

FTC’s Appellate Win Reflects Focus on Health Care Consolidation

In an important victory for the Federal Trade Commission in the appellate courts, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit recently affirmed last year’s decision from the District of Idaho in Saint Alphonsus Medical Center v. St. Luke’s Health System, No. 14-35173, in which the FTC successfully sued to undo a 2012 merger … Continue Reading

‘Product-Hopping’ Can Be Snagged Under the Antitrust Laws

The Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act, more commonly known as the Hatch-Waxman Act, together with the patent laws, attempt to advance the competing goals of preserving pharmaceutical companies’ incentives to make the staggering investments necessary to bring new, improved drugs to market, as well as fostering lower prices through competition from generic … Continue Reading

The FTC’s Section 5 Authority Discussed in Article by BakerHostetler Antitrust Attorneys

BakerHostetler antitrust attorneys Carl Hittinger and Jeffry Duffy authored the article, “FTC Section 5 in 2014: An Unexpected Attack, A New Frontier,” published in Law360 on December 22. The authors cover the FTC’s push to exercise its Section 5 authority in new areas; ever since Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act was created … Continue Reading

FTC Aggressively Pressing ‘Antitrust Trumps IP’ Theme

The Federal Trade Commission has recently brought its considerable institutional weight to bear in two developing areas at the intersection of unfair competition and intellectual property law. Continuing its crusade against “reverse-payment” patent infringement settlements in the pharmaceuticals sector, the FTC is promoting—especially in the Third Circuit—a maximalist interpretation of the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2013 … Continue Reading

BakerHostetler Lawyers Publish Chapter on Exemptions and Immunities in Antitrust Litigation

The 2015 Antitrust Review of the Americas features a chapter, “‘United States: Private Antitrust Litigation,” authored by BakerHostetler Antitrust Chair Robert G. Abrams, Partner Gregory J. Commins Jr., and Partner and Editor of Antitrust Advocate Danyll W. Foix.  They wrote: “US law is littered with dozens of immunities and exemptions that limit or preclude the … Continue Reading

A History of American Monopolists: Remembering One’s Non-Monopoly Roots

As the story goes, Ford Motor Co. almost never got off the ground because of a monopolist.  In 1903, the Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers (ALAM) tried to stop Henry Ford from building his first gasoline-powered four-stroke automobile.  The ALAM was composed of 11 car manufacturers, including, at the time, Cadillac, Winton and Packard.  Its … Continue Reading

BakerHostetler Antitrust Lawyer Examines Recent Developments in Antitrust Class Action Litigation

The Antitrust Review of the Americas 2015 features a chapter by BakerHostetler antitrust partner Edmund W. Searby entitled, “United States: Private Antitrust Litigation – Class Actions.”  He wrote: “As many appreciate, two Supreme Court decisions in the last seven years have assisted the defense of antitrust class actions.  The first and most significant is the enhancement … Continue Reading

A History of American Monopolists: Lessons Not Easily Learned

As the story goes, in 1902, President Teddy Roosevelt, wanting to make his mark on the presidency as a real deal “trust buster,” took aim at Wall Street by going after financial titan J.P. Morgan. Working with his then-attorney general, Pennsylvanian Philander Knox, Roosevelt decided to file an antitrust suit against the Northern Securities Co., … Continue Reading
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